Tag Archives: #SENreforms

‘Measure what you value not value what you measure’ . A special school context

 

The context

In my last blog I shared the presentation delivered by Mary Rayner HMI  when she spoke at a recent Greater Manchester leadership conference about the implementation of the Common Inspection Framework in the special school context.

One of the key messages we all took away with us was that in our schools there are many things in addition to Core and Foundation subjects which we value and want to celebrate, however, the onus is on us to ensure we are able to provide evidence of impact. It is not enough for us just to say how outstanding we are at for example personal and social development – how do we know? Importantly too if we are making a judgement of outstanding – what is that in relation to? How would it compare to other similar pupils in other similar settings?

Following the presentation, as a leadership team and then as a group of teachers, we have begun work on ensuring we have clarity on this in our own school.

The key questions for us were:

  • what areas ( in addition to Core and Foundation subjects) were we agreeing were the key areas we want to focus on / celebrate in terms of pupil achievement?
  • What are our existing sources of evidence for progress in these areas?
  • In what format do we want to present our evidence and who to? ( parents / governors / website)
  • On what basis are we making our judgements?
  • How do our judgements / evidence compare to that in other schools?

Where are we up to and what are our next steps?

The staff and governors have now agreed 9 key areas of achievement for our school. They are:

  • Core subjects
  • Foundation Subjects
  • Mobility
  • Social, Moral, Spiritual, Cultural (SMSC)
  • Behaviour
  • Communication
  • Characteristics of learning
  • Personal and social development (PSD)
  • Life Skills

We talked about how many of these overlap but can also identify key distinctions in our definitions of each one.

We then went onto deciding on and listing existing evidence sources for each area as we do not want to get into creating additional checklists for the sake of it! Many evidence sources are generic for each area e.g. formative assessment records, classroom observations, displays, end of year reports…however there are some evidence sources which are bespoke to individual areas e.g. for PSD / SMSC / Characteristics of learning – school council minutes have been included on the list of evidence sources.

We are now in the process of compiling case studies for each of the areas to which evidence sources which exemplify the progress made by some of our pupils will be attached. When complete, the table indicating our 9 areas of pupil progress with their evidence sources and anonymised case studies will be included on our website on the curriculum / assessment page.

Rather than relying solely on our own judgement however, in order to benchmark against other schools, we are working with special school leaders across Greater Manchester (in the established network   working group we have already which includes cross moderation of assessments), we are agreeing as a group what a ‘Gold standard’ case study should look like and then during 16 – 17 are planning to cross moderate each other’s case studies – a professional dialogue which will be really valuable.

On 13th July, we are going to discuss this topic between 8 – 8.30 p.m. on @SENexchange – a chat which I @Mishwood1, co-host with @cherrylkd and we would really love to hear from other schools about how you are tackling this issue? Let’s share good practice and ensure together we can make sure we achieve the best possible holistic outcomes for our children and young people with SEND.

Whilst this has been a conversation in this blog about learners with SEND, I am sure mainstream colleagues would agree that there are so many achievements other than core and foundation curriculum in all of our schools for all of our pupils so I would welcome views from all settings.

Thank you for reading and I look forward to hearing from you

Mary

 

 

 

 

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Inclusion ( Insert definition here)

inclusion
ɪnˈkluːʒ(ə)n/
noun
 1. the action or state of including or of being included within a group or structure.
“They have been selected for inclusion in the scheme”
Oxford Dictionary

Maybe I am slightly late to the party, however over recent weeks there has been alot of discussion on Twitter with regards to Inclusion of pupils with SEND in mainstream education and a number of blogs which have followed. I am grateful to @JulesDaulby for collating many of them on her blog site here: https://mainstreamsen.wordpress.com/

As I write this I am fully aware of how controversial and emotive this topic can be and how definitions of what ‘Inclusion’ actually is can vary so much, hence, as pondered what it meant to me, it led me to the title of this blog.

Time for me to put my two penneth in………………

I would personally like to approach inclusion from the perspective of all of our pupils being on a continuum of learning needs. In this context, for me inclusion is about a personalised learning package which meets each pupil’s individual and holistic needs. That would include their learning environment whether mainstream, special, part – time in each, unit etc but also their personalised curriculum. For me it is not about one or the other being a preferred option  – it is about what ever is the most appropriate for the individual to meet their needs.

I get frustrated in many ways when I hear links to mainstream schools for our pupils with SEND being referred to as ‘inclusion’ as if they are not included in the system without this. Don’t get me wrong, we work closely with mainstream schools to support them to be as ‘inclusive’ as possible in terms of educating as many pupils with SEND in mainstream settings as possible, however, for some of our pupils, the most ‘inclusive’ setting to meet their needs is actually a base in a specialist setting either for all, most or some of the time.

I know there are many imperfections in the system in terms of being able to achieve the  optimum of personalisation however, my personal position is that I do not see the existence of specialist provisions as being a barrier to inclusion but an essential part of a multi- faceted education system in which I will continue to advocate on behalf of all of our pupils in ensuring their individual needs are met in the best possible way.

 

 

 

#SENreforms: One year on – a special school perspective

The revised Code of Practice for children and young people with Special Educational Needs and Disability has now been statutory for a full academic year. On the publication of the Final Impact research report from the pathfinder Local Authorities I wanted to record the story of Camberwell Park School .

There was a general consensus that the statutory assessment process for children with special educational needs needed to change – an over bureaucratic and excessively lengthy process in which often the child and their needs was a by-product (that was my experience of it).  All of the  messages about the new Code of Practice in which we move away from Statements of Special Educational Needs towards Education, Health and Care Plans -The philosophy of  a more child / family centred process right from 0 – 25 years which is responsive to local need and has all agencies working together for a fully co-ordinated approach – what’s not to love?

Whilst I fully acknowledge it is not yet a perfect system – far from it – despite the challenges we have faced, our overall experience and the feedback we have had from the families, has been of a much more positive way of working – the children, their needs and their outcomes are now much more at the forefront. Let me tell you our successes, challenges and next steps…………………..

As a Manchester headteacher I was pleased that the Local Authority took a proactive approach. They had been a pathfinder for the reforms for young people with SEN from 16 – 25, but also established a multi-agency working party during summer 2014 to prepare for implementation of the reforms the following September.I was pleased to be invited to represent the special school sector in this group. During this term we also wished to be proactive as a school – training key staff in person centred planning and identifying a small cohort of families for us to pilot the revised annual review process. Where ever possible we already included our pupils in annual reviews and they prepared their own report prior to the meetings using symbol communication where needed. We set about updating our pupil booklet however in line with person centred planning tools and requirements for what was then the draft Code of Practice as well as establishing a parent voice booklet.

As a special school, all of our children have already had a statement of special educational needs so our year has been one of conversions of statements to Education, Health, Care Plans. We embarked on an ambitious programme to complete conversions for all of our 93 children in one year!

Our key successes

  • The annual review meetings in the new person centred format have been fantastic! They are very child centred and we have had much more open, honest and informative discussions enabling us to establish meaningful and relevant outcomes for the children and their families. The feedback we have received from parents / carers have included these comments in the most recent parent / carer questionnaire:

‘I think the way the new EHCP have been conducted was a lovely change. Having everyone to contribute was effective and positive.’

‘School meetings have always been informative. The teachers have always wanted to know my thoughts and feelings on subjects that have been discussed.’

  • As already mentioned, pupil voice has always been important but we have worked hard on developing further the tools the children have to express their views  and they continue to amaze us with their ability  to express their likes, dislikes, aspirations for the future and what others can do to help them using their pupil views booklet as a framework. Parents / carers too we have found have valued the family views booklet to help them prepare for discussions in the reviews
  • We grappled with how we relate the outcomes set in the annual reviews / EHCP match to our existing Individual Education Plan programme in which personalised targets focussed on ‘barriers to learning’ are established. The timing of the two things were not marrying therefore the process was not co-ordinated enough. We needed to find a way of setting targets following annual reviews and making sure we follow up  on progress each term including parents / carers and other agencies. We have now established a programme of holding all annual reviews in the autumn term following which all pupils have personalised ‘My Learning Targets’ set using EHCP / annual review outcomes. These are then updated each term including feedback / discussion from parents / carers at parent’s evening and information from other agencies where appropriate and then updated / amended as necessary.
  • We are have worked closely with the high school which most of our pupils move to in terms of the transition reviews to ensure that the move from primary to high school is as smooth as possible for both the child and their family. We have recently included gaining pupil views on their transition programme into our questionnaires to see how prepared the pupils feel for their next stage of education and to inform any changes we might want / need to make to the process.
  • We have worked hard on the SEN Information report on our website – consulting with parents / carers on what they wanted included and trying to make it  as user friendly, informative, relevant and meaningful as possible

Our main challenges

Whilst the results of the changes have been mainly positive, I cannot pretend the year has been without it’s challenges – some of which we have resolved and some are work in progress!

  • Each of the annual reviews are taking much more time – on average one and a half hours, plus all the preparation time and putting together paper work afterwards. Not for one minute am I complaining about giving what is essential and valued time to the children and their families and as has been said, the meetings are one of the biggest successes, however, we feel that the meetings are important enough to ensure it is always a member of the senior management team which leads them, therefore, logistically it has placed a much bigger challenge on our time – not insurmountable but has needed lots of adjustments of roles / responsibilities and timetabling
  • The administration is a nightmare! We haven’t  got this one fully sorted yet and I would be delighted to know if anyone out there has cracked this? We are paying for additional admin time to minute the meetings, however, the meeting format does not lend itself well to direct minuting and doesn’t match directly to the paperwork required by the LA so is requiring a lot of additional time for us proof reading and amending after the meetings have finished
  • Multi- agency involvement continues to be a challenge – one of the central themes of the reforms is that it is a ‘health and care’ plan in addition to education. We have had lots of support from other agencies in trying to find ways forward and for the most part we are now getting multi-agency reports to be included in meetings. There are two key reasons for this challenge – one is that multi-agency team members are much less available than they were due to cut backs in services so often are not able to allocate the time to attend meetings. In addition, when are families are so complex and have many agencies involved, it is difficult to schedule meetings when everyone is available, even well in advance. Working with our multi agency teams we have had some improved success for the forthcoming year identifying the priorities for each child and who it is most essential to attend e.g. nurse, speech and lang therapist, with others contributing a report  – but as the discussion is so valuable at the meetings, in an ideal world they would all be there!

So our next steps……………

I think the honest answer is that it all continues to be work in progress!

Our programme of annual reviews for 2015 / 2016 is already in place and all members of multi-agency teams have had the dates. We will continue to be Passionate about ensuring our pupils achieve the best outcomes possible, be Respectful of all of the individual needs of the pupils and their families, be Organised in making sure everyone has the information they need to contribute, be Understanding of individual circumstances and how we can best support and be Dedicated in ensuring we are the best we can be. Camberwell Park continues to be a school to be PROUD of

Supporting meaningful ‘pupil voice’ for children and young people with #SEN

When @Cherrylkd and I discussed establishing @SENexchange, we were very concious of how broad an area SEN is and we wanted to ensure that it is relevant to the whole SEN community. For this reason we invited our @SENexchange folllowers to suggest possible areas for discussion which we collated into a blog http://wp.me/p5Qdrj-1q. At this time, I added a discussion topic of my own: Pupil voice

Pupil voice is something I am very passionate about and something we have done alot of work on in my own school @Camberwell Park camberwellpark.manchester.dbprimary.com. If our pupils are at the heart of our school , then for me, pupil voice must be an integral part of the school ethos. For us, this starts with being a Unicef Rights Respecting School and ensuring appropriate access for the children to all articles within the UNCRC http://www.unicef.org.uk/Documents/Publication-pdfs/UNCRC_summary.pdf. Indeed Article 23 of the UNCRC spells out our responsibility to ensure children with a disability play an active role in their community, for me having a voice is an important part of this and as @MaryMyatt reminded us in a recent tweet to @SENexchange, it should also be considered as part of ‘British Values’ and SMSC in the school.

As the pupils in my own school have a range of learning needs ranging from more moderate learning difficulties, right through to profound and multiple learning difficulties, sharing their views is not always quite so easy and I believe it is up to us to find a way of supporting and enabling their voice to be heard not just within the school but beyond the school.

A couple of years ago, as a school we appointed a person with a ‘teaching and learning responsibility’ (TLR) to look at how we support pupil voice in their own learning and how we meaningfully implement it across school. What emerged was our 7 stages of pupil voice (video clips and other resources held in the school exemplify each of the stages):

Stage 1- Adult to notice child’s reaction to activity/ experience and give the child the language to describe this

Stage 2- Child to eye-point to demonstrate choice

Stage 3- Child to reach towards or touch object/ symbol/ switch to indicate choice

Stage 4- Child to independently indicate choice by grasping and moving object/ using voice/ signing

Stage 5- Child to say what they have done well or need to try harder with

Stage 6- Child to say what they could do next time to improve

Stage 7- Child to comment on their peer’s achievements

These 7 stages are mainly about children being involved in their learning and their involvement in setting the priority targets for learning and having child friendly Individual Education Plans is part of this too. Pupil self-evaluation of their own learning is now embedded into all classrooms.

Over the last few years in the school, we have developed pupil involvement in whole school self evaluation and school improvement and how we hear the voice of our pupils in a range of ways including developing the running of the school council to ensure pupils have opportunities to discuss a wider range of whole school issues and involving pupils on our learning walks around school to hear their views on aspects such as displays, behaviour and safety, total communication etc, Our pupils are now also regularly involved in recruitment of new staff. The school council have written their own person pupil person specification which goes out with information / application packs. Where appropriate pupils are involved in interview panels asking questions relating to their person specification.

It is also important to me to consider how the views of our pupils are represented beyond our school. I appreciated a tweet from @anameescapesme when the discussion topic regarding pupil voice was first tweeted on @senexchange reminding us about the challenges of LAs listening to the views of our children and young people. At Camberwell Park, the pupils have always been involved in their annual reviews of their Statement of Special Educational Needs, and we have ensured this continues with the change over to Education, Health, Care Plans ( EHCPs). Our pupil voice booklet http://tinyurl.com/np5vjfw  is prepared by the pupils supported by one of the classroom staff prior to the review and the pupil attends their review to share their views with others. Their views are included in the minutes booklet is attached and forms part of the appendices in the EHCPs.

Another important area we have been exploring and developing in terms of pupil voice is that of safeguarding. Our children and young people with learning difficulties are very vulnerable. Giving our pupils the vocabulary and enabling them to have a voice about what is safe, not safe, tell us when they are worried, scared, upset, being bullied etc is really important. Our frustration at how the views and experience of our pupils are disregarded when there have been allegations of abuse has led us as a school to look at how we can support our pupil voice in this area too.

Our ‘pupil voice’ work is by no means a finished product and we are concious of how in our best endeavours to allow pupils a choice, for our some of less able or more complex children the choices we give them are often guided and limited by those which we offer. We would of course use our knowledge of the children and information about the children by others that know them even better than us such as their parents in the choices we have available. We continue to explore however, how we can make pupil voice more meaningful with the bank of strategies we have available. In addition to total communication strategies of signing and symbols, the range of AAC ( Augmentative and alternative communication) products open up new possibilities for us: Ipads,  E-tran frames http://www.communicationmatters.org.uk/page/e-tran-frames  use of PODD ( Pragmatic Organisation Dynamic Display) Communication Books:http://www.inclusive.co.uk/podd-p6023 and more recently exploration of how we can use Talking mats http://www.talkingmats.com/ are just a few examples. Use of P4C ( Philosophy for Children) throughout the school has also very mjuch supported the ability of our pupils to express their views on a range of important topics.

To end where I started this blog – Pupil voice is an area I am very passionate about and keen to discuss with others – I know there is alot we can ‘exchange’ and learn from each other in this area so really hope that people will join with us on @SENexchange at 7.30 p.m. on Wed 29th April to chat further. My blog only represents my views and the experience of Camberwell Park School. Would be so good to hear from the experience of others  – both mainstream and special and from parents / carers too about how they would like to work with schools to get the views of their child considered.

Our children and young people deserve to be heard  – it is our job to ensure they are!

Thank you

Supporting pupil and parent voice in Statutory Annual Reviews : #SEND Reforms

The pupils are firmly at the heart of Camberwell Park School and having established ways of including pupil voice in all aspects of our work is something already embedded into the school.

We already had a ‘pupil voice’ booklet as part of the statutory annual review process. This included sections about what the pupils like, dislike about school, their achievements, what helps them to learn and what they have to look forward to in the future. The booklets were completed in the classroom supported by a member of the pupils’ class team prior to the review using symbols and other total communication strategies to ensure meaningful access where necessary. Where ever we have felt it appropriate and possible the pupils have attended part of their annual review meeting to present their report and their report has always been included as part of the annual review minutes. Considering how we could build on and develop ensuring the voice of our pupils into the Education, Health, Care Plan (ECHP) process was therefore a natural progression for us.

Our starting point was to consider the information required by the Code of Practice and Local Authority including annual review paperwork linking in to all of the areas to be discussed as part of person centred planning reviews and other aspects about our children that we felt it is essential to include. This includes likes / dislikes, what is important to the child now and in the future, things they are good at / not good at and how best to support them, how they communicate and make decisions and how to keep them safe, healthy and learning as well as their hopes and dreams. We have also included in the booklet, entitled ‘A meeting all about me’, information presented in a child friendly form about who will be present at the meeting to support their understanding and preparation for attending. The booklet is on our school website: http://tinyurl.com/np5vjfw

The pupil voice booklet has been discussed and agreed with the School Council who have in turn discussed and agreed a slightly more simplified version for our youngest children in school.

The children continue to make us proud and amaze us with their ability to share their views on what on the surface may seem really difficult questions for them to consider. Examples of their views include:
“I talk alot and can sometimes make decisions on my own. I sometimes need to be told to do things a number of times’” Pupil quote, Autumn 14
They have also told us what they think about sharing their views at meetings, for example:
“I like joining in meetings. I feel happy because people say how well I am doing. They listen to me. My ‘all about me booklet’ helped me to say what I wanted to say” Pupil quote, Spring 2015
Whilst pupil voice is imperative and for us is a starting point, it is only a part of the holistic person centred planning process. It is about ensuring that throughout the process, everyone involved keeps the child and their needs central at all times in a very genuine way. We believe that as a school, through our policy and procedures, we set the tone for making sure this happens.
Information about our EHCP meetings and process is a part of our SEN Information Report on the school website http://tinyurl.com/kjp9p22 ensuring even before starting at the school expectations are clear. Our SEN Information report links in turn to the Local Offer for our Local Authority (Manchester) in order to place what we are providing in the wider context of other provision available. http://tinyurl.com/kl8mj5n We are working in close liaison with the Local Authority throughout this process of transition from statements to EHCPs making sure what we are doing meets statutory requirements but in a way that is constructive and helpful for the school and others involved.
Parents and carers, their views and involvement are a key part of the EHCP process and our SEN Information report outlines some of the ways we inform, listen to and involve parents / carers in the process. As with the pupils, we provide a parent / carer views booklet to enable them to prepare for the review meeting http://tinyurl.com/nnxtdxu . As with the pupil booklet, the family booklet is based around the information to be discussed and shared at the review and that is required by the Local Authority review paper work for the EHCP. We understand that not all parents /carers find it easy to articulate and represent their views so where needed the pupils’ key workers from their class teams support the parents /carers in completing their views booklet and in helping them prepare for the reviews generally. Parent / carer workshops and coffee mornings have also supported their understanding of the new process, how important their views are and how they can share their views.

Parents /carers have told us how much they like the new person centred planning approach to reviews, for example:
“The review meetings are very informative and helpful. I can ask or put forward any worries I have about my child’s education, health or wellbeing’ Parent quote, Autumn 14
As we are talking about and Education, Health and Care plan, in terms of a holistic understanding of our pupils others involved with the pupils including health staff such as physiotherapists, school nurse and social care staff including social workers, family support workers and short break providers should also be included. To ensure we do not miss anyone important involved in a child’s life from a family perspective, as part of the invitation process we ask parents /carers who they would like to be invited. The importance of co-ordinated multi-agency working to ensure outcomes identified are appropriate and met Members of the multi-agency team have also told us how much they have valued the new ways of working, for example:
“The EHCP meetings I have attended are informative and clarified the important issues for all present supporting the setting of appropriate short term and long term targets. The meetings also celebrated the successes, achievements and progress to date”. Quote, teacher for the deaf, Spring 15

The review meetings themselves are run as Person Centred Planning reviews as established by Helen Sanderson Associates http://tinyurl.com/qgrt5ot . We have found that this organisation, format and style of review has enabled all involved to share their views in an open and confident way which truly does ensure we keep the child and their needs as the central focus throughout.

Our current development in school is around how we ensure that actions relating to outcomes identified for the pupils are fully implemented and met. For this purpose, at Camberwell Park, ‘My learning targets’ (MLTs) have now replaced the previous Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and fully consist of the action plans from the review meeting. In order to ensure the children are fully involved, a child friendly version of MLTs are used in the classrooms and as well as copies being shared with parents / carers following the annual review, a parents’ evening for each of the subsequent two terms ensure families have a chance to discuss and contribute to monitoring of progress towards outcomes. As a school we liaise closely with members of the multi-agency team ensuring information relating to other aspects of a pupil’s holistic action plan are considered throughout the year.

At Camberwell Park we are Passionate about ensuring we fully embrace and respond to the opportunities the SEN Reforms have opened for our pupils. We Respect the individual needs of each and every one of our pupils. We are Organised in the systems we have put in place. We Understand that the pupils’ needs should be seen in the context of their families and we are Dedicated to ensuring our pupils receive and achieve the best outcomes possible. We are PROUD and privileged to be able to work with such amazing pupils and their families

Preparing for the implementation of the SEN reforms : The School Offer

The changes afforded by the SEN reforms have been much heralded. Consultation has been ongoing since the SEN Green Paper  – Support and Aspiration: A new approach to special educational needs and disability‘ was published in 2011. Here we are however in March 2013, waiting for the publication of the final version of the revised Code of Practice which at the time of writing this is still in draft and are all busy in our individual authorities and schools ensuring we are ready for September implementation of the changes.

This blog focuses on the development of our own ‘School Offer’. It is not a proposal of a right or wrong way of doing things – in fact, the thrust of the SEN reforms is that within a consistent framework, Local Authorities and in turn schools, respond in a way that is most relevant and pertinent to the local community they serve. This has been / is our way of doing it……………………

Current offer

As part of the preparations for implementing the changes afforded by the SEN reforms / revised Code of Practice, Camberwell Park School has established their ‘School Offer’ which is now published on the school website.

The themes for the offer were established in line with Manchester Local Authority suggestions as: Teaching and Learning, Keeping our children safe, Annual Reviews, Health, Home-school Communication, Working together, Help for Families, Transition to High School and Extra Curricular Activities.

The school was keen to ensure the information in the school’s offer was clear and accessible to parents / carers and those seeking information about the school and therefore visual icons were used as signposts to the different sections in the offer, plain language has been used in each section and relevant quotes included from Ofsted and parents/ carers used where relevant and appropriate to support the statements made about the provision offered.

The offer on the website is based on the school’s current provision and will be updated in line with any developments e.g. a planned move to a new school building in March 2015  which will bring enhanced provision opportunities.

Governor and parent /carer feedback

Governors and parents / carers have been consulted by the school about the offer with an overwhelmingly positive response including that the information is clear, relevant and informative. Some parents commented that it was easy to read without getting lost in jargon and one commented on the helpful size of the print! Many commented on content of particular sections in the offer and how it was helpful seeing a summary of the school provision in one place on the website. One parent commented “I feel the school offer shows real care for the children at the core which is reinforced by the Ofsted comments”. Another commented on how having the sections in PDF format made it easy for them to save and to print.

Governors / parents and carers also have made a number of helpful and supportive suggestions for further development of the School Offer which the school plans to take on board including more use of photographs within the sections on the offer. As far as additional content, parents / carers have asked for some information about what happens in different classes to be included and for more information about what other agencies provide within the school such as speech and language, physiotherapy etc. as well as more info about the specialist resources in the school such as the sensory room.

Future developments

As in all local authorities, at the time of writing this piece, Manchester is still working on a range of aspects of SEN reforms including developing the format of Education, Health, Care Plans ( EHCPs) and the provision of personal budgets .

Regarding Education Health Care Plans, (EHCPs), Camberwell Park School is working with the Local Authority on piloting a primary EHCPs with four families within our own school during the summer term 2014 in order to plan for rolling out the programme over the following year and senior school staff are being trained to run ‘Person Centred Planning’ reviews. I am also the special school head teacher representative on the Local Authority strategic working group planning the roll out of EHCPs across the authority.

Busy, but interesting times ahead  which will hopefully do as intended and support us to work  in more co-ordinated way with the needs of our children / young people and their families firmly at the heart of what we do.

I will blog again on other aspects of the #SEN reforms as things develop.

Mary Isherwood

9th  March 2014